A manual for writers of research papers, theses, and dissertations : Chicago style for students and researchers / Kate L. Turabian ; revised by Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, Joseph M. Williams, and University of Chicago Press editorial staff.

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Bibliographic Details
Uniform Title:Chicago guides to writing, editing, and publishing.
Main Author: Turabian, Kate L.
Language:English
Published: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2007.
Edition:Seventh edition.
Series:Chicago guides to writing, editing, and publishing.
Subjects:
Genre:
Physical Description:xviii, 466 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Format: Book
Contents:
  • pt. I. Research and writing : from planning to production/ Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, Joseph M. Williams
  • Overview of part I
  • 1. What research is and how researchers think about it
  • 1.1. How researchers think about their aims
  • 1.2. Three kinds of questions that researchers ask
  • 2. Moving from a topic to a question to a working hypothesis
  • 2.1. Find a question in your topic
  • 2.2. Propose some working answers
  • 2.3. Build a storyboard to plan and guide your work
  • 2.4. Organize a writing support group
  • 3. Finding useful sources
  • 3.1. Understand the kinds of sources readers expect you to use
  • 3.2. Record your sources fully, accurately, and appropriately
  • 3.3. Search for sources systematically
  • 3.4. Evaluate sources for relevance and reliability
  • 3.5. Look beyond the usual kinds of references
  • 4. Engaging sources
  • 4.1. Read generously to understand, then critically to engage and evaluate
  • 4.2. Take notes systematically
  • 4.3. Take useful notes
  • 4.4. Write as you read
  • 4.5. Review your progress
  • 4.6. Manage moments of normal panic
  • 5. Planning your argument
  • 5.1. What a research argument is and is not
  • 5.2. Build your argument around answers to readers' questions
  • 5.3. Turn your working hypothesis into a claim
  • 5.4. Assemble the elements of your argument
  • 5.5. Distinguish arguments based on evidence from arguments based on warrants
  • 5.6. Assemble an argument
  • 6. Planning a first draft
  • 6.1. Avoid unhelpful plans
  • 6.2. Create a plan that meets your readers' needs
  • 6.3. File away leftovers
  • 7. Drafting your report
  • 7.1. Draft in the way that feels most comfortable
  • 7.2. Develop productive drafting habits
  • 7.3. Use your key terms to keep yourself on track
  • 7.4. Quote, paraphrase, and summarize appropriately
  • 7.5. Integrate quotations into your text
  • 7.6. Use footnotes and endnotes judiciously
  • 7.7. Interpret complex or detailed evidence before you offer it
  • 7.8. Be open to surprises
  • 7.9. Guard against inadvertent plagiarism
  • 7.10. Guard against inappropriate assistance
  • 7.11. Work through chronic procrastination and writer's block
  • 8. Presenting evidence in tables and figures
  • 8.1. Choose verbal or visual representations
  • 8.2. Choose the most effective graphic
  • 8.3. Design tables and figures
  • 8.4. Communicate data ethically
  • 9. Revising your draft
  • 9.1. Check your introduction, conclusion, and claim
  • 9.2. Make sure the body of your report is coherent
  • 9.3. Check your paragraphs
  • 9.4. Let your draft cool, then paraphrase it
  • 10. Writing your final introduction and conclusion
  • 10.1. Draft your final introduction
  • 10.2. Draft your final conclusion
  • 10.3. Write your title last
  • 11. Revising sentences
  • 11.1. Focus on the first seven or eight words of a sentence
  • 11.2. Diagnose what you read
  • 11.3. Choose the right word
  • 11.4. Polish it off
  • 11.5. Give it up and print it out
  • 12. Learning from your returned paper
  • 12.1. Find general principles in specific comments
  • 12.2. Talk to your instructor
  • 13. Presenting research in alternative forums
  • 13.1. Plan your oral presentation
  • 13.2. Design your presentation to be listened to
  • 13.3. Plan your poster presentation
  • 13.4. Plan your conference proposal
  • 14. On the spirit of research
  • pt. II. Source citation
  • 15. General introduction to citation practices
  • 15.1. Reasons for citing your sources
  • 15.2. The requirements of citation
  • 15.3. Two citation styles
  • 15.4. Citation of electronic sources
  • 15.5. Preparation of citations
  • 15.6. A word on citation software
  • 16. Notes-bibliography style : the basic form
  • 16.1. Basic patterns
  • 16.2. Bibliographies
  • 16.3. Notes
  • 16.4. Short forms for notes
  • 17. Notes-bibliography style : citing specific types of sources
  • 17.1. Books
  • 17.2. Journal articles
  • 17.3. Magazine articles
  • 17.4. Newspaper articles
  • 17.5. Additional types of published sources
  • 17.6. Unpublished sources
  • 17.7. Informally published electronic sources
  • 17.8. Sources in the visual and performing arts
  • 17.9. Public documents
  • 17.10. One source quoted in another
  • 18. Parenthetical citations-reference list style : the basic form
  • 18.1. Basic patterns
  • 18.2. Reference lists
  • 18.3. Parenthetical citations
  • 19. Parenthetical citations-reference list style : citing specific types of sources
  • 19.1. Books
  • 19.2. Journal articles
  • 19.3. Magazine articles
  • 19.4. Newspaper articles
  • 19.5. Additional types of published sources
  • 19.6. Unpublished sources
  • 19.7. Informally published electronic sources
  • 19.8. Sources in the visual and performing arts
  • 19.9. Public documents
  • 19.10. One source quoted in another
  • pt. III. Style
  • 20. Spelling
  • 20.1. Plurals
  • 20.2. Possessives
  • 20.3. Compounds and words formed with prefixes
  • 20.4. Line breaks
  • 21. Punctuation
  • 21.1. Period
  • 21.2. Comma
  • 21.3. Semicolon
  • 21.4. Colon
  • 21.5. Question mark
  • 21.6. Exclamation point
  • 21.7. Hyphen and dashes
  • 21.8. Parentheses and brackets
  • 21.9. Slashes
  • 21.10. Quotation marks
  • 21.11. Multiple punctuation marks
  • 22. Names, special terms, and titles of works
  • 22.1. Names
  • 22.2. Special terms
  • 22.3. Titles of works
  • 23. Numbers
  • 23.1. Words or numerals?
  • 23.2. Plurals and punctuation
  • 23.3. Date systems
  • 23.4. Numbers used outside the text
  • 24. Abbreviations
  • 24.1. General principles
  • 24.2. Names and titles
  • 24.3. Geographical terms
  • 24.4. Time and dates
  • 24.5. Units of measure
  • 24.6. The Bible and other sacred works
  • 24.7. Abbreviations in citations and other scholarly contexts
  • 25. Quotations
  • 25.1. Quoting accurately and avoiding plagiarism
  • 25.2. Incorporating quotations into your text
  • 25.3. Modifying quotations
  • 26. Tables and figures
  • 26.1. General issues
  • 26.2. Tables
  • 26.3. Figures
  • Appendix. Paper format and submission
  • A.1. General format requirements
  • A.2. Format requirements for specific elements
  • A.3. Submission requirements.